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Family Law Journal: May 2011

David Hodson and Denise Carter set out the new ADR provisions in the FPR 2010 and consider their likely impact

The Family Procedure Rules 2010 (SI 2010/2955) came into force on Wednesday 6 April 2011. They are a complete overhaul of the Family Proceedings Rules 1991 (FPR 1991), which are wholly replaced. For practitioners and clients, an important change is the requirement to see a mediator before commencement of court proceedings.

Hannah Budd and David Hodson highlight the provisions of the FPR 2010 in relation to divorce and civil partnership dissolution

The provisions relating to divorce and civil partnerships are found within Part 7 of the Family Procedure Rules 2010 (SI 2010/2955) (FPR 2010), which came into force on Wednesday 6 April 2011, and should be read in conjunction with the Practice Direction 7A (PD 7A).

Nicola Criscione looks at the impact of the FPR 2010 on procedure in children proceedings

This article looks at the new Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010) that came into effect on 6 April 2011 in respect of private law proceedings relating to children. The rules are mainly contained in Part 12 FPR 2010, which is divided into seven chapters. The article will also consider Part 16 FPR 2010, which deals with the representation of children and reports in proceedings involving children so far as they apply to private law proceedings.

Lucy Loizou and David Hodson examine the new rules regarding financial disputes and the transitional arrangements under the FPR 2010

The new rules relating to financial matters are found in Part 9 of the new Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010) that came into force on 6 April 2011. There is an accompanying practice direction, PD9A, with a protocol and pre-action protocol annexed to it.

Ellie Foster reflects on the harmonisation of the rules relating to appeals and potential pitfalls under the FPR 2010

The procedure pre-6 April 2011 for appeals in family proceedings could be somewhat confusing. A complicated mix of the Family Proceedings Rules 1991 (FPR 1991), the Rules of the Supreme Court 1965 and the County Court Rules 1981, not to mention the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR 1998), ensured the process was less than straightforward. So the arrival of the new Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010), with the much-trumpeted aims of harmonisation and simplicity by way of one set of clearly expressed rules for all family proceedings, can surely go some way towards streamlining the appeals process.

Withers LLP

Vanessa Mitchell and James Copson discuss the changes introduced by the costs provisions in the FPR 2010

To what extent can the family practitioner be relieved that they do not have to adapt to another set of new costs rules with the advent of the new Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010) that came into force on 6 April 2011, or disappointed that the much-needed simplification of the rules has been avoided?